I’m Holding Out for a Hero 11/20/21

Well friends, first I hope you are all well.  Second, I am looking for “Hero Stories”.  As Bonnie Tyler’s infamous ’80s song would say, “I need a hero, I’m holding out for a hero till the morning light.”  Bonnie’s Hero song  And for those of you like me, who can’t unpair this song from the 1984 film “Footloose,” I’m also giving you the Scene from Footloose 🙂

See below for a description of our Hero Highlights category. Material can be submitted  anonymously. Word expectation: 600-800 words is typical, we can talk about more words, and will always take less, as impactful messages can be very brief sometimes. Contact me or submit your blog entry for consideration at: madamchik@tristatetraumanetwork.org

Hero Highlights category of the “The Hope Chest” blog:

In our Hero Highlights posts, we will be focused upon trauma-informed “heroes” in our community. Professionals and/or agencies that exemplify what it means to be trauma-informed or trauma-responsive will be written about. These can be posts from consumers receiving their services or posts from the agencies or professionals themselves, sharing stories about what they did to be more trauma-informed or responsive in their practices and what impact that had upon those they serve or upon their fellow employees.

Thank you for being part of our Network! I look forward to your submission for this blog!

May your day be sprinkled with HOPE!

Melissa Adamchik, Executive Director, Tristate Trauma Network

A Trauma Warrior Learns To Be Her Own Hero Part 2 11/13/21

This is a continuation of Teri Wellbrock’s blog post on 11/7/21, titled “A Trauma Warrior Learns to Be Her Own Hero”.  Go back and read that one if you haven’t already 🙂

….And I dove in. Spending weeks creating content, editing, mulling over ideas, cheering myself on, submitting lectures to my Teachable Onboarding Specialist for her feedback, and launching a pre-sale on the two courses I completed: a Trauma-Warrior 1-Day Introductory Course and a Be Your Own Hero 10-Day Course. I cried tears of joy as they went live, knowing the pain of my past was weaved with the hope of my triumph to create these complimentary healing lessons!

The Course Curriculum for the Trauma-Warrior course, which is intended to give students a sampling of content available in the more in-depth Be Your Own Hero course, includes:

Trauma-Warrior Welcome

Module 1: ACEs Science Introduction

Module 2: Healing Strategies Intro

Module 3: The Positive Effects of Hope

Module 4: Positive Affirmations

Module 5: Mini Meditation

Module 6: Continue Your Hope for Healing Journey

 

The Course Curriculum for the Be Your Own Hero 10-Day Course, which includes videos, challenges, prompts, a bonus gift, and more, consists of:

Welcome!

Day 1: Review of 1-Day Course and Upcoming Content

Day 2: ACEs Science and Writing

Day 3: Healing Strategies

Day 4: Hope Science

Day 5: Power of Positivity

Day 6: A Deeper Dive into Forgiveness

Day 7: Mindfulness & Meditation

Day 8: Creating Your Own Healing Plan

Day 9: Summarizing What You’ve Learned and Additional Material

Day 10: Continuing Your Healing Journey

Warrior Coaching

I also elected to meet with my fellow survivors in a coaching role. Not to delve out therapeutic advice, as I gladly leave that to the licensed professionals, but, rather, to offer a hand to hold in a been-there-done-that survivor role. Only I’ve transitioned into thriver mode and have a plethora of street cred to share. I joke that I have a PhD in trauma survival! My goal with this service is to walk alongside those with trauma history or adverse childhood experiences, particularly those with higher ACEs scores, me on one side, a therapist on the other, both of us holding a hand, encouraging our triver-to-be, “You’ve got this! I believe in you!” as their inner trauma-warrior learns to be their own hero.

Peace and blessings,
Teri Wellbrock

Trauma-Warrior #hopeforhealing

P.S. Register for courses and/or coaching at academy.teriwellbrock.com and subscribe to my Hope for Healing Newsletter at https://teriwellbrock.com/ Also, be sure to join me for hope-filled conversations on The Healing Place Podcast on your favorite podcast audio outlet or on the Teri Wellbrock YouTube channel.

Teri’s online Trauma Warrior courses handout 

Thank you for this wonderful resource that you’ve placed in the TTN Hope Chest, Teri!

There Goes My Hero (one of my favorite Foo Fighter songs of all time)

May Your Day Be Sprinkled with HOPE,

Melissa Adamchik, Executive Director, Tristate Trauma Network

Hero Highlight #1 – Soft Rock & A Warm Blanket 10/17/21

Introduction to the Hero Highlights category of the “The Hope Chest” blog: In our Hero Highlights posts, we will be focused upon trauma-informed “heroes” in our community.  Professionals and/or agencies that exemplify what it means to be trauma-informed or trauma-responsive will be written about. These can be posts from consumers receiving their services or posts from the agencies or professionals themselves,  sharing stories about what they did to be more trauma-informed or responsive in their practices and what impact that had upon those they serve or upon their fellow employees.

For reasons I don’t yet fully understand (and won’t until I receive the results), I was referred for an MRI earlier in the week after a doctor’s appointment.  I took the first available appointment and found myself in the waiting area at St. Elizabeth Healthcare at 8:15am on Saturday morning with my husband.  Needless to say, getting referred for an MRI is scary. These tests aren’t the go-to for most health issues, but they are able to reveal things doctors are unable to see with their own eyes and instruments. I’d like to share my experience with the Radiology tech, and it’s the same thing I wrote on the “Care Gram” I asked for upon the completion of my MRI service at the hospital. I walked away from this experience thinking, “now there’s a hero story” for the blog. The following are the words I used to describe my MRI experience with a wonderful technician named Brett M.

“From the moment Brett greeted me and my husband, he created a sense of calm. He presented as a caring, competent professional, asking questions with care and compassion about my background and any current health issues that would need to be taken into account when administering an MRI. He really took care to create a safe space with physical and psychological comfort by asking if I wanted a warm blanket and what kind of music I’d like to listen to, if any, during the procedure.  (Side note: I said, “yes” to the warm blanket and “yes” to the music. They are both comforting to me in different ways and it was actually a little cold in the office. But I may have asked for the warm blanket anyway because warm blankets aren’t just for warmth. They’re soft and cozy, and perfect for times of stress and anxiety, which bring cold, tense, tight uncomfortable feelings. )

“Throughout the entire process, Brett was calm and caring. Even the directive to squeeze the bulb if I needed him during the procedure was more than simply following protocol. He genuinely wanted to let me know he was there to help me if needed.  MRIs are scary because they aim to reveal the unknown pieces that are creating concerning bodily responses.  Brett made the entire process not only less ominous and daunting, he took away my fear to the point that I found myself just enjoying and singing along in my head to the music he chose for me,  when I had given him a pretty vague category of “soft rock”.”

My Care Gram concluded with the following: “In my professional life, I run an agency that promotes trauma-informed care, the Tristate Trauma Network. I wanted to not only praise Brett, but to lift up his approach and behavior as a prime example of what trauma-informed care truly looks and feels like.  Thank you, Brett, for reducing my anxiety and fear about this procedure.  Thank you for being a caring human being who exemplifies proper treatment of patients during medical procedures.” I stopped my Care Gram there, but I do have one more acknowledgement to make as I know that it’s very much about the agency and not just the individual when these things happen: Thank you, St. Elizabeth Healthcare, for seeing and nurturing in Brett his capacity to replace fear with comfort and safety. It’s what we all need a little more of in life, especially right now.

Sincerely,
Melissa Adamchik

And to all of you reading this, I wish you again, a day sprinkled with hope from your own or someone else’s “Hope Chest.”

A cover of the soft rock song “Stand by Me”